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Mongabay: Air pollution caused by fires set for land-clearing on Sumatra has become a regularly occurrence in Southeast Asia, spurring hand-wringing in Singapore and Malaysia over health effects and worries among environmentalists over the climate impacts. While these fires are often termed "forest fires", the reality is much of the area that burns each year has already been deforested and today mostly consists of grass, scrub, and remnants of what was once forest. But the impacts are nonetheless very substantial,...
Posted: August 21, 2014, 1:02 am
Hispanic Business: Worried about global warming, a growing number of churches and other faith groups are divesting their holdings in fossil fuel companies that release large amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. "The warning in scripture that 'the wages of sin is death' could not be more literally true than it is in the case of fossil fuels," said Serene Jones, president of New York's Union Theological Seminary, whose board voted earlier this summer to divest its $108.4 million...
Posted: August 21, 2014, 12:07 am
Associated Press: An Ohio man who uses a biblical reference and a statement against "poisoned waters" on billboards opposing wells for disposal of gas-drilling wastewater is fighting a legal threat from the Texas well owner on free-speech grounds. Austin, Texas-based Buckeye Brine alleges in a July lawsuit that the billboards paid for by Michael Boals, of Coshocton in eastern Ohio, contain false and defamatory attacks against its two wells, which dispose of contaminated wastewater from oil and gas drilling. An...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 9:02 pm
Toledo Blade: From the boat docks of Ohio State University's Stone Laboratory, practically a stone's throw from the party headquarters known as Put-in-Bay tiny green specs are in the early stages of bunching up and floating on Lake Erie's surface. It's been an all-too-familiar sight to Great Lakes scientists who use that lab, the oldest freshwater field station in the United States, since 1995. For the moment, they have no reason to panic. But they also know those tiny green specs are nature's way of putting...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 9:02 pm
RedOrbit: About 10 million years into the current Cenozoic Era, or roughly 56 million years ago, during a climate that was hot and wet, two groups of mammals moved from land to water. These were the cetaceans, which include whales, dolphins and porpoises, and the sirenians, with its sea cows, manatees and dugongs. Over time, their bodies began to adapt to their new environment. They lost their hind limbs, and their forelimbs began to resemble flippers. Their nostrils moved higher on their skulls. The cetaceans...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 8:18 pm
Environment News Service: Climate change will slash up to nine percent off the South Asian economy every year by the end of this century if the world continues on its current fossil-fuel intensive path, the Asian Development Bank warns in a new report. The human and financial toll could be even higher if the damage from floods, droughts, and other extreme weather events is included, the bank says. "South Asia's economy is under serious threat and the lives and livelihoods of millions of South Asians inhabiting the region's...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 7:32 pm
EcoWatch: Recalling a disastrous 2002 salmon die-off in the rivers of northern California`s Klamath Basin, members of Native tribes in that area, including the Karuk, Yurok and Hoopa, are pressuring the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to act to prevent another kill they say is imminent. Tribal members are asking for the release of water from the Lewiston Dam on the Trinity River to prevent the spread of a parasite that preys on salmon and thrives in warmer, shallower water. While the bureau says it will release...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 6:35 pm
Reuters: The cleanup of a 5,000-gallon fuel oil spill from a Duke Energy Corp power plant into the Ohio River could stretch into Thursday, Duke said on Wednesday, as the U.S. Coast Guard reopened a 15-mile section of the river to limited traffic. The Coast Guard closed a stretch of the river between Cincinnati, Ohio, and Dayton, Kentucky, on Tuesday after late Monday's spill. The incident occurred during what Duke called a "routine transfer of fuel oil" at the company's 60-year-old W.C. Beckjord Station...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 5:12 pm
Guardian: As the severe drought continues for a third year, water levels in the state’s lakes and reservoirs are reaching historic lows
Posted: August 20, 2014, 4:31 pm
Climate Desk: A $1 billion lawsuit accuses the Japanese nuclear energy company Tepco of lying about radiation levels. This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The article was reported by the Guardian`s Suzanne Goldenberg, and the video was produced by Climate Desk`s James West. The first time it occurred to James Jackson that there could be lasting damage from his US Navy service during Japan`s tsunami and nuclear disaster came...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 4:16 pm
Yale Environment 360: Exporting U.S. coal to South Korean power plants could cut greenhouse gas emissions by 21 percent compared to burning it at less efficient U.S. plants, according to researchers at Duke University. The strategy could also generate more than $25 billion in economic activity in the U.S. and cut emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and particulate matter, the researchers say. For those benefits to occur, however, U.S. plants would need to replace the exported coal with natural gas, and South...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 4:02 pm
Politico: Actor Leonardo DiCaprio is lending his voice and support to a new short film, bringing attention to climate change and calling for federal action over carbon pollution. "We cannot sit idly by and watch the fossil fuel industry make billions at our collective expense. We must put a price on carbon -- now,' DiCaprio says in his narration of "Carbon,' released Wednesday. "If national governments won't take action, your community can,' DiCaprio says. "We can move our economy town by town, state...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 3:22 pm
Blue and Green: Policymakers need to consider the impacts of both climate change and land use when studying ecosystems, researchers have said. A study has found that when the two factors are analysed together, there are variances in the findings depending on the region. Volker Radeloff, one of the researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, said, “For conservation, as the world is changing, we want to know, how will wildlife respond. We need to take both land use and climate into account as we look...
Posted: August 20, 2014, 12:04 pm
National Geographic: At the end of 2012, at a time when many states were replacing their aging coal plants, Arkansas switched on a new $1.8-billion coal plant, one of two the state has fired up in the past five years. The state saw emissions from its power plants rise 35 percent between 2005 and 2012, even as other states turned to cleaner-burning natural gas and the nation's overall power plant emissions trended downward. "We know we're a coal-heavy state," said Teresa Marks, director of the Arkansas Department...
Posted: August 19, 2014, 10:02 pm
Hill: Climate change is making ticks, mosquitoes and poison ivy more prevalent, jeopardizing the outdoor experience, according to a new report. The National Wildlife Federation (NWF) warns in a report released Tuesday that changes in weather patterns are also increasing the number of invasive pests that potentially carry diseases, or can harm those seeking to enjoy the outdoors. "The climate crisis is really impacting the outdoor American experience," said Colin O'Mara, president of NWF. "When you...
Posted: August 19, 2014, 7:09 pm
Bloomberg: Australia is frightening developers away from renewable energy even before the government decides whether to overhaul targets for the industry’s growth. Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s decision to take advice on renewable energy targets from a skeptic about the causes of global warming prompted at least two developers to reconsider plans for wind and solar farms. Earlier this week, the company planning a giant solar plant in Mildura pulled out of the project citing the risk the government will rework...
Posted: August 19, 2014, 7:01 pm
Climate Central: Monitor wildfires with our interactive wildfires map (above). The flame icons represent wildfires currently active in the lower 48 states and Alaska. Hover over a given fire to see its name, and if you zoom in you’ll be able to see the outline of the area that’s burning — the so-called fire perimeter. If you click within the perimeter, a window pops up showing the fire’s size in acres, the amount by which the perimeter has grown or shrunk over the past 24 hours, the fraction of the fire that has...
Posted: August 19, 2014, 6:02 pm
Australian Broadcasting Corporation: Climate change will cut South Asia's growth almost 9 per cent by the end of the century unless world governments try harder to counter global warming, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) warns. According to the ADB's report, titled Assessing the Costs of Climate Change and Adaptation in South Asia, the costs of countering climate change in South Asia will also increase over time and will be prohibitively high in the long term. Gross domestic product (GDP) losses are projected at 12.6 per cent...
Posted: August 19, 2014, 5:58 pm
ClimateWire: Two years ago, the home of the Kentucky Derby, Kentucky Fried Chicken and the Louisville Slugger received an unwelcome distinction: fastest-warming heat island in the United States. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology found that since the 1960s, urban Louisville, Ky., saw its temperature rise above that of its surroundings at a rate greater than any other city in the country and more than double the warming rate of the planet as a whole. This trend puts Louisville on track to...
Posted: August 19, 2014, 2:00 pm
BusinessGreen: It's happening, people. On Sunday, one out of every five light bulbs in your home was powered using wind energy. If you own three TVs and two games consoles (you know who are), one of those was powered using wind energy as well. You would need 10 light bulbs to find one that was powered using coal. This surge in wind power was the result of particularly favourable weather conditions, but this weekend was not quite the anomaly its record performance suggests. According to new government figures,...
Posted: August 19, 2014, 12:45 pm
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